Tag Archives: cashews

Nuts are powerful

nuts-mixedNuts are powerful for our health. The evidence is in and there’s a lot of it. Nuts, such as cashews, walnuts, hazelnuts and almonds, can reduce the risk of death from diabetes by 40 percent, cut heart disease by 30 percent, and reduce the risk of cancer by 15 percent. They also lower the risk of high blood pressure and gall stones, and can even lower cholesterol and triglycerides.  Even more good news – it only takes a handful or two of nuts two or three times a week to gain these benefits. Read more

Crunchy Cashew Recipes

The following recipe is from www.nutritionmd.org reprinted with permission 

cashewsCashew Tacos

Makes 12 tacos

Ingredients

1/2 cup chopped raw cashews

1 cup shredded lettuce

12 warmed corn tortillas or 12 taco shells

1/2 teaspoon salt

1 tablespoon tomato paste

1 tablespoon water

1 tablespoon chili powder

1 tablespoon chopped garlic

1/2 cup chopped onion

1 zucchini, chopped

1 cup fresh tomato salsa

Sauté cashews, zucchini, onion, garlic, chili powder, water, tomato paste, and salt until onion turns translucent. Add 1/12 of the mixture to each tortilla or taco shell, followed by lettuce and salsa.

 

Untitled-1The following recipes are from The Veg-Feasting Cookbook

Broccoli and Cashews over Millet

Light and delicate, millet is a nice, high-protein alternative to couscous. The combination of millet, cashews, and broccoli makes a substantial side dish.

Serves 5

Ingredients

2 cups millet

6½ cups water

2 tablespoons oil

2 teaspoons mustard seed

1 large bunch broccoli, chopped

1 medium onion, chopped

½ cup cashews, chopped

1 tablespoon soy sauce

 

Place the millet and 6 cups of the water in a medium saucepan, cover and cook over medium-high heat until the millet is soft, 15 to 20 minutes. While the millet is cooking,

heat the oil in a large pan. Add the mustard seeds and cover the pan. As the seeds fry they will begin to pop (like popcorn). When you no longer hear any seeds popping (a minute or so), add the broccoli, onion, the remaining half cup of water, cashews and soy sauce. Sauté the ingredients until the broccoli is tender, about 15 minutes. Serve the sautéed mixture over the cooked millet.

 

Cashew Coconut Date Cookies

You can use pre-ground cardamom for this recipe or grind your own, which will give it a more intense flavor. Break the pods open and crush the black seeds with a mortar and pestle. Be sure the dates you use for this recipe are fresh and moist. Organic medjool dates are particularly nice.

Makes about 40 cookies

Ingredients

1½ cups quick or old-fashioned oats, ground fine in a food processor, or oat flour

1 cup unbleached all-purpose flour

¾ teaspoon sea salt

½ teaspoon baking powder

½ teaspoon baking soda

½ teaspoon ground cardamom

1 cup natural unsalted cashew butter

3 tablespoons water

½ cup maple syrup

1 teaspoon vanilla extract

1 cup natural granulated sugar (like Sucanat)

2/3 cup nonhydrogenated margarine

2/3 cup unsweetened grated coconut

½ cup finely chopped pitted dates

Approximately 40 cashew halves (optional)

 

Heat the oven to 350F.  Line two baking sheets with parchment paper. In a small bowl whisk together the ground oats, flour, salt, baking powder, baking soda and cardamom; set aside. Using an electric mixer, beat the cashew butter with the water in a large bowl until smooth. Add the maple syrup and vanilla and beat until well blended. Add the sugar and margarine and beat until completely incorporated. Add the dry ingredients and beat on low speed just until completely blended. Stir in the coconut and dates.

Drop the dough by rounded teaspoonfuls onto the baking sheets. Press each dough ball gently with your fingers, and nestle one cashew half, if using, into each dough ball. Bake until the tops are lightly browned but the cookies are still slightly soft, 10 to 12 minutes. Cool on wire racks

Nuts are good for you!

Nuts separatedGood news for nut lovers: Nuts do more than add texture and flavor to meatless meals such as salads, veggie burgers, and pilafs—they also add nutrients. Nuts have protein, vitamins, minerals and fiber. They also have excellent array of phytonutrients and some are very high in omega 3 essential fatty acids. Nuts have been shown to lower the risk of many common diseases such as heart disease, high blood pressure, inflammation and some cancers.

Some nuts of note: Chestnuts are actually low in calories and contain some very special probiotics. Hazelnuts have high levels of phytonutrients especially if the skin is eaten with the nut. Pistachios are a good choice for those looking for extra fiber as they contain as much fiber as oatmeal. Walnuts are an excellent source of Omega 3 essential fatty acids. Just one ounce of walnuts contain a full day’s requirement. Cashews are a good source for zinc, one of the harder to find minerals. Almonds are a good choice for vitamin E and calcium.

A little goes a long way when it comes to nuts. A one ounce serving five to seven times a week is all that is needed to reap the benefits. Beware of nut spoilers! Many nuts are sold fried in oil and heavily salted. This is a shame because it spoils to some extent the health value of nuts and overshadows their desirable natural nutty taste. Instead choose dry roasted unsalted nuts. When shopping, buy whole nuts and chop them yourself; small chopped pieces are more vulnerable to oxidation (exposure to air, which can make them stale). Store nuts in a cool place to help keep them fresh.

When considering the crunch factor, don’t forget about seeds. Chia seeds and flaxseeds are excellent choices for omega 3 essential fatty acids. Hemp seeds are a good choice for fiber and protein. Sesame seeds are a good choice for those looking for some extra calcium in their diet. Pumpkin seeds have a generous amount of zinc.

Just as with nuts, a little goes a long way. Seeds need only be eaten in moderation for the best health benefit. Also beware of seeds fried in oil and then salted. Look for dry roasted unsalted whole seeds for both best flavor and health. For storage and best shelf life only chop or grind seeds just before you use them.

Nuts provide an almost endless variety of scrumptious culinary uses. We recommend The Nut Gourmet by Zel Allen, a cookbook that features 150 plant-based recipes that put nuts at center stage.