Tag Archives: recipes

Chickpea Mash Stew Recipe

vegfeastckbk_small_borderThis is one of my favorite soup recipes from The Veg-Feasting Cookbook. You can make this soup as smooth or chunky as you like, depending on how much you mash or puree it. Serve it with some nice crusty whole-grain bread.

Serves 6 to 8

1½ tablespoons olive oil

2 medium onions, chopped (about 1½ cups)

2 medium ribs celery, chopped (about 1 cup)

2 medium carrots, chopped (about 1 cup)

3 cloves garlic, chopped

¼ teaspoon sea salt

Freshly ground black pepper

1 medium zucchini, chopped

1½ teaspoons dry mustard

¾ teaspoon ground dried sage

2 (14-ounce) cans chickpeas, rinsed and drained (about 3½ cups)

1 (28-ounce) can diced tomatoes (do not drain)

2 cups vegetable broth

1 cup water

½ cup sun-dried tomatoes, chopped

1 tablespoon tamari

2 teaspoons molasses

1 large bay leaf

1 tablespoon chopped fresh thyme

In a large stockpot or Dutch oven, heat the olive oil over medium heat. Add the onions, celery, carrots, garlic, salt and black pepper to taste. Cover and cook, stirring occasionally, until the vegetables soften, 6 to 8 minutes. Add the zucchini, mustard, and sage, and cook, stirring for a couple of minutes. Add the chickpeas, canned tomatoes and their juice, broth, water, sun-dried tomatoes, tamari, molasses and bay leaf, and bring to a boil. Reduce the heat, cover and simmer 15 to 20 minutes.

Remove but reserve the bay leaf, and mash or lightly puree the soup (keeping it slightly chunky), then stir in fresh thyme. Add the bay leaf back in and simmer for another 3 to 5 minutes. Adjust the seasonings with more salt and pepper to taste, remove the bay leaf and serve.

Vegan Mac n Cheese – Homemade Vegan Pantry

Miyoko looking over shoulder - croppedMiyoko Schinner, frequent speaker at Vegfest, has produced another great book, “The Homemade Vegan Pantry, the art of making your own staples” (Ten Speed Press, Random House, 2015). Miyoko is a renowned vegan chef, cookbook author, and television cooking show host, and has been promoting delicious, decadent, and healthful plant-based foods for the past thirty years. Her previous cookbook, Artisan Vegan Cheese, has been a top-selling book on Amazon, and has been called “The holy grail of the culinary world.” She is a co-host of Vegan Mashup, a new cooking show on public television, and stars in her own whimsical online show, Miyoko’s Kitchen.

Homemade vegan pantryComplete with full-color photos, The Homemade Vegan Pantry celebrates beautiful, handcrafted foods that don’t take a ton of time, from ice cream and pizza dough, to granola and breakfast sausage. Miyoko Schinner guides readers through the techniques for making French-style buttercreams, roasted tomatoes, and pasta without special equipment. Her easy methods make “slow food” fast, and full of flavor. The Homemade Vegan Pantry raises the bar on plant-based cuisine, not only for vegans and vegetarians, but also for the growing number of Americans looking to eat lighter and healthier, and anyone interested in a handcrafted approach to food.

Well Crafted Macaroni and Cheese Mix Recipe

Unless you were raised by macrobiotic hippies, you’ve had it. I’ve had it. And there’s no shame in saying it— we’ve all had macaroni and cheese out of the box. My kids would plead with me to buy it, and I was thrilled when the vegan stuff came on the market. Maybe you don’t crave it anymore, but it sure is convenient to have some on hand for the kids or the babysitter. But there’s no need to buy it, because you can make the instant cheese sauce mix yourself in just a few minutes! This version is richer than the variation that follows, utilizing glorious cashews.

Well-crafted macaroni and cheese mix1 cup cashews

¾ cup nutritional yeast

¼ cup oat flour

¼ cup tapioca flour

1 tablespoon paprika

1 tablespoon organic sugar

2 teaspoons powdered mustard

2 teaspoons sea salt

2 teaspoons onion powder

Add all of the ingredients to a food processor and process until a powder is formed. There should not be any discernible chunks or large granules of cashews, so this may take 3 to 4 minutes of processing. Store this in a jar or portion out into 1⁄3 -cup increments and put in ziplock bags and store in the pantry for a month or two or in the refrigerator for up to 6 months.

MAKES 1 2/3 CUPS, OR ENOUGH TO COAT THE EQUIVALENT OF 5 STORE-BOUGHT BOXES INSTANT MACARONI AND CHEESE

HOW TO USE WELL-CRAFTED MACARONI AND CHEESE MIX

Cook 1 cup of dry macaroni according to package instructions and drain. Combine 1⁄3 cup mix with 1 cup water or unsweetened nondairy milk in a saucepan over medium-low heat. Whisk well and bring to a boil. Simmer for 1 minute, then toss with hot cooked macaroni.

These mixes are also a great answer for turning yesterday’s leftovers into a quick casserole. Just combine leftover pasta, potatoes, or grains, some veggies, and any other odd scraps you think might be a good fit and mix it in a casserole dish with some of the cheese mix and water. You can add additional spices and herbs if you wish. Then bake it all up into creamy goodness. You can also use the mix to make quick sauces for veggies or add it to soups for extra cheesy flavor and richness—it’s quite versatile.

Grilled Jicama Rounds with Black Beans – from Grills Gone Vegan

JicamaJicama is a round root vegetable originally from the Mexican peninsula. It’s grown in Central America, the Caribbean, the Andes and South Asia, where it’s a valuable food source. Its texture is similar to a turnip, but the taste when raw is more like an apple. The skin is tough and needs to be peeled. It’s high in fiber, and helps promote good bacteria in the gut. It’s also a valuable source of vitamin C, and includes some B vitamins, potassium and other minerals.  Since it’s low in calories, it’s a great food to snack on.

This recipe is from Grills Gone Vegan, by Tamasin Noyes, reprinted with permission.

Grills Gone Vegan_low resYield 6 servings. Advance prep: Marinate the jicama for 1 hour.

Marinated Jicama

1 tablespoon reduced-sodium tamari

1 tablespoon seasoned rice vinegar

1 teaspoon olive oil

¼ teaspoon liquid smoke

1 jicama, peeled and cut into 1/8-inch-thick rounds

Black Bean Topping

1 (15-ounce) can black beans, drained and rinsed

1 carrot, shredded

½ poblano chile, seeded and minced

3 tablespoons minced red onion

1 tablespoon seasoned rice vinegar

2 cloves garlic, minced

1 teaspoon extra-virgin olive oil

1 teaspoon reduced-sodium tamari

½ teaspoon dried oregano

Salt

Ground pepper

1 avocado, diced, for garnish

To prepare the jicama, put the tamari, vinegar, oil, and liquid smoke in a 13 x 9-inch nonreactive baking pan and stir to combine. Add the jicama and turn to coat. Let marinate at room temperature for 1 hour, turning the jicama occasionally.

To prepare the topping, put the beans, carrot, chile, onion, vinegar, garlic, oil, tamari, and oregano in a medium bowl. Stir gently, taking care not to crush the beans. Season with salt and pepper to taste.

To grill the jicama and assemble the rounds, preheat a grill, grill pan, or electric grill to medium-high heat.

Lightly oil the grill with canola oil. Put the jicama on the grill, reserving the marinade. Cook until marked, about 4 minutes, while occasionally basting with the marinade. Turn over and cook in the same fashion until the other side is marked, about 3 minutes longer. (If using an electric grill, keep it open and cook a few minutes longer if necessary.)

Put the jicama on serving plates and top each round with a heaping ¼ cup of the bean mixture and a few pieces of the avocado.

Orange Blackberry Cake Recipe – from The Veg-Feasting Cookbook

vegfeastckbk_small_borderWe compiled The Veg-Feasting Cookbook by inviting local veg-friendly restaurants to give us their best recipes. We added in a few special recipes from Vegfest chefs and the result was a wonderful vegetarian cookbook covering the full spectrum of cuisines from around the world.

This wonderful 3-layer cake recipe is made without eggs or dairy.  With blackberries being freely available for the picking at this time of year, this is a perfect time to give this recipe a try.

Orange Blackberry Cake Recipe

This is a delightfully refreshing cake, with the winning combination of citrus and fresh berries. Try it with your favorite berries—raspberries, salmonberries, marionberries, blueberries—or a mixture.

Makes one 9-inch cake

6 cups unbleached white flour

4½ cups plus 1/3 cup granulated sugar

4 teaspoons baking soda

2 teaspoons sea salt

1 cup canola oil

½ cup grated zest and 3 cups juice from

6 medium oranges, preferably organic

1 tablespoon vanilla

6 cups blackberries

1/3 cup cane sugar

3 tablespoons corn starch

2 cups powdered sugar

To make the cake, heat the oven to 350°F (325 if using a convection oven). Grease three 9-inch round cake pans, line the bottoms with waxed paper, and grease and flour the paper.  Sift the flour, 4½ cups granulated sugar, baking soda and salt into a large bowl. In a separate bowl, combine the canola oil, orange zest and juice, vanilla and 3 cups filtered water, then pour them into the dry ingredients and whisk to combine. Divide the batter evenly into the 3 pans and bake until the layers are golden brown and spring back when touched lightly in the center, 20 to 25 minutes. Cool the layers for 10 minutes in their pans, then turn out onto wire racks and cool completely.

To make the filling, put the blackberries and 1/3 cup sugar in a saucepan and bring them to a boil. Combine the cornstarch with ¼ cup filtered water and stir to dissolve. Add to the berry mixture and simmer for a couple of minutes, then set aside to cool.

To assemble the cake, whisk the powdered sugar with ¼ cup water to make a glaze. Place one cake layer on a plate and spread with 1/3 of the filling, then drizzle with a little of the glaze. Repeat with the second and third cake layers, drizzling any remaining glaze around the edges of the cake so it flows down the sides. Chill to set.

Indonesian Mushroom Skewers – from Asian Fusion

Asian FusionChat Mingkwan learned to cook as a small boy in the kitchen at home in Thailand. He learned western cooking as an apprentice in provincial France, and then came to the US where he offered his French cooking always with a twist of Thai or perfected his Thai cooking with a hint of French techniques to fit the western kitchen. He’s now doing what he likes most: cooking, teaching, traveling, writing, and making sure that people who come in contact with him have a full stomach and a good time. Chat has written several cookbooks including Buddha’s Table, Vietnamese Fusion and Asian Fusion. He was a presenter at Seattle’s Vegfest this year (2015).

Indonesian Mushroom Skewers Satay                

Makes 12-16 pieces, Serves 6

Indonesia is well known for its food on skewers-satay, which is a cooking technique brought along by Arab traders from their kabob. A variety of ingredients that can be cut up, marinated, and skewered are destined to be satay. Satay can be found anywhere in Indonesia at home cooking, high-end restaurants, and street vendors. On the streets, one can just follow the BBQ aroma in the air or just trail the smoke from wood burning grills to easily find the satays.

Marinade

1 pound portabello mushrooms

2 tablespoons finely minced garlic

2 tablespoons finely minced ginger

2 stalks finely minced lemongrass, tender midsection only (½ cup)

2 tablespoons finely minced green onions

1 tablespoon ground pepper

1 teaspoon salt

1 package bamboo sticks (skewers)

Vegetable oil for brushing

Slice the mushrooms into ½-inch thick, long strips, using only the caps of the mushrooms. Skewer each piece with a bamboo stick, threading the stick through the mushrooms.

Combine the garlic, ginger, lemongrass, and green onions. Rub the marinade mixture all over the mushrooms, making sure that all mushroom surfaces are covered. Sprinkle the mushrooms with ground pepper and salt. Arrange and stack the mushrooms in a tray and sprinkle lightly with vegetable oil. Cover with plastic wrap and set aside to marinate overnight in a refrigerator or at least 1 hour at room temperature.

Heat a grill pan or prepare a charcoal grill 30 minutes in advance to get a medium heat. Grill the mushrooms, turning occasionally, until done about 2-4 minutes. Brush the mushrooms lightly with oil to make them moist. Serve the mushrooms with the sauce.

Sweet Soy Sauce    (Makes 1 cup)

1/3 cup soy sauce

½ cup brown sugar

2 tablespoons tomato paste or ketchup

2 tablespoons white vinegar

2 tablespoons minced onion

2 tablespoons minced ginger

1 tablespoon chili paste sambal olek, more or less to taste

Combine the soy sauce and sugar in a small pot over medium heat. Cook until the sugar is dissolved, about 2-3 minutes. Remove from the heat and let cool. Add the rest of the ingredients and stir to mix well. If the sauce is too thick, add some water.

Tempeh Gumbo Recipe – from Cookin’ Crunk

Cookin Crunk_COVER_lo-resBianca Phillips has been piddlin’ around her mama’s and granny’s kitchens since she was knee-high to a grasshopper (that’s Southern speak for “really little”). She hasn’t had any fancy culinary training, but she’s a firm believer that great Southern chefs learn to cook from the soul. The Arkansas native and current resident of Memphis, Tennessee grew up not too far from the muddy banks of the Mississippi River. That meant cornbread, butter beans, collard greens, and Paula Deen.

As a 7-year vegan and 17-year vegetarian, Bianca is dedicated to veganizing soul food and country classics. She is the author of Cookin’ Crunk: Eatin’ Vegan in the Dirty South, a soulful collection of down-home comfort food recipes made without meats, eggs, dairy, or other animal by-products. She has presented twice at Vegfest in Seattle.  Here’s a favorite recipe from her book:

Tempeh Gumbo

1/3 cup plus 1 tablespoon canola oil

1 onion, chopped

2 cloves garlic, minced

8 ounces tempeh, cubed

2 stalks celery, chopped

1 green bell pepper, chopped

½ cup whole wheat pastry flour

6 cups low-sodium vegetable broth

1 can (28 ounces) no-salt-added, stewed tomatoes with juice

2 cups sliced fresh okra

½ cup chopped fresh parsley, lightly packed

2 teaspoons dried thyme

½ teaspoon Cajun seasoning

½ teaspoon cayenne

2 bay leaves

Salt

Ground pepper

Heat 1 tablespoon of the oil in a large skillet over medium heat. Add the onion and cook, stirring frequently, for 2 to 3 minutes. Add the garlic and cook, stirring frequently, for 1 minute. Add the tempeh and cook, stirring frequently, until browned all over, about 5 minutes. Add the celery and bell pepper and cook, stirring frequently, until tender, about 5 minutes.

Heat 1/3 cup of the oil in a large soup pot over low heat. Gradually add the flour, stirring it in 1 to 2 tablespoons at a time. After all the flour is added, continue to cook, stirring constantly, until the mixture turns dark brown, about 10 minutes. Stir in the broth. Add the tempeh mixture, the tomatoes and their juice, and the okra, parsley, thyme, Cajun seasoning, cayenne, and bay leaves and mix well. Increase the heat to high and bring to a boil. Decrease the heat to medium, cover, and cook, stirring occasionally, until the vegetables are tender, about 30 minutes. Season with salt and pepper to taste. Remove the bay leaves before serving.

Quinoa Paella recipe – from Kitchen Divided

Kichen DividedEllen Jaffe Jones is “THE VEG COACH,” aka “The Broccoli Rep.” Because as she says, “Who else IS the broccoli rep?” She is an inspiring motivational speaker, personal trainer, running coach, author, and instructor of healthy cooking classes designed by respected doctors and registered dietitian. Before becoming a cookbook author, Ellen was a popular, award-winning TV investigative reporter and anchor for 18 years in Miami and St. Louis. She became known as the “Earth Mother in a Suit” when she left TV and became a successful financial consultant at Smith Barney for 5 years. Combining both backgrounds, she wrote “Eat Vegan on $4 a Day” after seeing too many news stories saying eating healthfully was impossible on a budget.

In this cookbook, Kitchen Divided, Ellen addresses the heated issues that can arise when vegans and meat-eaters share the same kitchen. Speaking both from first-hand experience and using suggestions gleaned from her network of cooking students, social media groups, and other vegans, Ellen diplomatically maps out workable approaches along with guidelines on how to implement them.

Quinoa Paella

Makes 4 Servings

2¼ cups water

1 carrot, finely chopped

1 red bell pepper, finely chopped

½ cup finely chopped onion

1 clove garlic, finely chopped

1 cup quinoa

¼ teaspoon ground pepper

¼ teaspoon ground turmeric or crushed saffron threads

4 ounces vegan chicken, thawed if frozen, cut into ½ inch cubes

4 ounces vegan kielbasa or vegan turkey, thawed if frozen, cut into ½ inch rounds or chunks

4 ounces vegan prawns or shrimp, thawed if frozen

1 cup frozen petite peas

4 lemon wedges

Put ¼ cup of the water in a large skillet, then add the carrot, bell pepper, onion and garlic.  Cook over medium heat, stirring occasionally and adding more water as needed to prevent sticking, just until vegetables are tender, about 15 minutes.

Stir in the remaining water and the quinoa, pepper and turmeric and bring to a boil over high heat.  Decrease the heat to low, cover, and cook for 10 minutes.

Stir in vegan chicken, vegan kielbasa, vegan prawns and peas. Cover and cook until the quinoa is tender and everything is heated through, about 10 minutes.  Serve garnished with lemon wedges.

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