Category Archives: Food Products & Recipes

Vegfest Chef Chat Mingkwan Recipes

We’re delighted to have Chef Chat Mingkwan back with us at Vegfest giving cooking demos this year.  As a special treat, he shared three of his delicious recipes with us. Come to Vegfest to learn more from Chat about Thai and Vietnamese cooking.

Green Beans with Peanut Dressing

Serves 6

3 cups green beans, trimmed, cut to 1½ inch length
2 cups julienne color bell peppers (your choice of serving fresh or cooked.)

Bring a large pot of water to a rolling boil. Parboil the green beans for 1-2 minutes. Drain and immediately plunge into a bowl of iced water for 2 minutes more. Drain and blot dry. Keep chilled. Read more

Warming Soup Recipes

This is the time of year when it’s often cold and dreary outside, and there’s nothing better than a delicious bowl of soup to warm you up.  Did you know that making a pot of soup from scratch is actually very simple to do, and it’s oh, so healthy?  Try some of our recipes below and get cooking!

Pumpkin-SoupPumpkin Soup

This recipe is from nutritionmd.org, where you’ll find a great supply of delicious vegan recipes.  It’s reprinted with permission. Makes about 8 1-cup servings.

This sweet and creamy soup has just a hint of spiciness. It can also be made with puréed winter squash, yams, or sweet potatoes in place of the pumpkin. Read more

Kombucha – the inside story

GT Dave - low resKombucha is a rising star in the health-food world.  We reached out to GT Dave, founder of GT’s Living Foods, one of the first companies to bring Kombucha to the American market.  Here’s what he told us:

What is Kombucha?

Authentic Kombucha is an organic, raw, and naturally effervescent probiotic tea. The tea is fermented with a Kombucha culture, known as a SCOBY (which looks a lot like a giant mushroom). During fermentation, a variety of beneficial enzymes, probiotics, and organic acids are created. By nature, Kombucha is low in calories, 100% vegan, and dairy-free, making it a wonderful and healthy alternative to soda. Read more

Holiday Pie Recipes

Over the holidays, many people get together to enjoy a meal with family.  Pies make the perfect dessert – portable for potlucks, eye-catching, and delicious.  The challenge is making them as healthy as possible, by avoiding animal products and keeping the sugar and fat to a minimum. This piecrust recipe is both easy and healthy!

For toppings, look for vegan whipped cream, such as Soya Too. Coconut ice cream is another delicious alternative to whipped cream.

Simple and Flaky Piecrust

Read more

Tasty Tempeh recipes

tempeh 2Tempeh is a valuable source of protein, and a great meat substitute. It is made from soybeans that have been cooked and fermented with a special culture that binds the beans together into a firm, sliceable cake. The fermentation process also makes tempeh easy to digest.

Tempeh has a chewy texture and a hearty, somewhat mushroom-like flavor. It’s a nutritional superstar – one serving gives 20 grams of protein, 6 grams of fiber and plenty of cancer-fighting soy isofavones.

Temeph easily absorbs flavors and can be baked, boiled, fried or steamed. It can be sliced, cubed or crumbled to make a variety of dishes, and keeps well in the freezer without sacrificing its texture.

Recipes

Recipes from “The Veg-Feasting Cookbook” by Vegetarians of Washington

Curried Tempeh Salad

This protein-packed salad goes equally well on a bed of salad greens or tucked into a pita pocket. It keeps well in the refrigerator.
Serves 8

2 pounds tempeh, cut in small cubes
2 tablespoons vegetable oil
2 cups vegan mayonnaise
4 tablespoons curry powder
1 tablespoon prepared mustard
1 teaspoon vegetarian Worcestershire Sauce
0.25 teaspoon ground cumin
1 medium red onion, diced small
6 medium ribs celery, chopped
1 cup walnuts, toasted in a dry skillet and chopped
0.5 cup chopped fresh parsley,

Preheat the oven to 375°F. Toss the tempeh cubes with the oil and spread in a single layer on a large baking sheet. Bake until golden brown, about 15 minutes. Allow to cool.

While the tempeh is baking, combine the mayonnaise, curry powder, mustard, Worcestershire sauce and cumin in a large bowl and whisk to blend. Add the onion, celery, walnuts and parsley and stir to combine. Add the cooled tempeh and stir gently until just blended.

 

Tempeh Tacos

This is an ideal “do it yourself ” meal. Serve the taco shells, filling, and condiments family-style at the table and let everyone build their own protein-rich tempeh tacos.

Serves 4

1 tablespoon extra virgin olive oil
1 large onion, diced
5 large cloves garlic, minced fine
Salt
4.5 teaspoons ground cumin
1 tablespoon chili powder (or to taste)
2 (8-ounce) packages tempeh, chopped fine
1 (6-ounce) can tomato paste
1 package taco shells

Taco Condiments

1 cup shredded cheddar-style soy cheese
2 medium tomatoes, chopped fine
3 ounces sprouts, such as alfalfa, broccoli, or radish
1 ripe avocado, chopped
Taco sauce or salsa
Put the olive oil in a large skillet and warm over medium heat. Add the diced onions, garlic and about 1.5 teaspoons salt. Sauté until the onions begin to soften and turn translucent, about 5 minutes. Add the cumin and chili powder and stir to incorporate. Add the tempeh, stir to incorporate and sauté for 5 minutes, stirring regularly so the mixture doesn’t stick to the bottom of the skillet. Add the tomato paste and 1.5 cups water. Stir until all the tomato paste and water are thoroughly blended with the tempeh mixture. The mixture should be thick but not dry. If it is dry, add up to 6 tablespoons water. Taste and add salt and extra spices if necessary. Cover the skillet, reduce heat to low and cook for 10 minutes.

Place some tempeh taco filling in the bottom of each taco shell. Top with shredded soy cheese, tomatoes, avocado and sprouts. Sprinkle taco sauce over the top.

 

Tempeh Bacon

Simple and tasty, this seasoned tempeh can be used to accompany pancakes or turned into a vegetarian “TLT” sandwich.
Serves 4 to 6

½ teaspoon dried oregano
½ teaspoon dried thyme
½ teaspoon dried basil
¼ cup high-oleic safflower oil, or organic canola oil
1 (8-ounce) package tempeh, cut crosswise into ¼-inch-wide strips
1 tablespoon tamari or shoyu (soy sauce)

In a small bowl, thoroughly stir together the oregano, thyme, and basil. Line a dinner plate with a paper towel and set near the stove. Heat a 10-inch skillet over medium-high heat, add 2 tablespoons of the oil, then half of the tempeh strips. Fry the slices briefly, about 30 seconds on each side.

Sprinkle half of the herb mixture over the tempeh as it fries. Remove the tempeh slices and place them on the prepared plate. Repeat the process with the remaining oil, tempeh and herbs. When finished, sprinkle the fried tempeh with the tamari and serve.

Not your father’s veggie burger

Veggie burgers ain’t what (and where) they used to be. The food industry has been making one innovation after the other and spreading the availability of veggie burgers far and wide, including some unexpected places.

McVegan

The new McVegan

A few days ago, news broke that rocked the veggie burger landscape: McDonald’s, yes McDonald’s, is testing a vegan burger. Meet the McVegan. Hoping to quietly test the McVegan away from the attention of the American public, McDonald’s went to a far away, really far away, place, Finland. Yup! the future of the new McDonald’s vegan burger is in the hands of the Finns. But don’t worry, they won’t let us down. The new McVegan is already getting rave reviews. If the test goes well, we may just find the new vegan burger right here at home.

Impossible cheeseburger

The Impossible Burger

 

Meanwhile, when the good people at Impossible Foods said they were going to make a veggie burger so realistic it will bleed and even char just like a juicy hamburger, many people said that’s “impossible.”  But they’ve done it, and it is quickly being made available around the country. The burger contains no animal fat, yet the flavor profile mimics that of 80/20 ground beef. Before it’s seasoned and layered with toppings, a nearly three-ounce patty clocks in at 220 calories and costs $13 – a little pricey but the price has been coming down.

Many people see a very profitable future for the new Impossible Burger. That’s why Impossible Foods secured $80 million over five years to develop the product that was later backed by Bill Gates and Khosla Ventures. The Impossible Burger is not yet available here in Washington but it’s getting close. The Impossible Burger is available in St. Helena in northern California. Because they use no animal products, the Impossible Burger uses a fraction of the Earth’s natural resources. Compared to cows, the Impossible Burger uses 95% less land, 74% less water, and creates 87% less greenhouse gas emissions. And of course, no animals were hurt in the making of these burgers!

Zippy Zucchini Recipes

Zucchini - white backgroundZucchini, also known as a courgette, is a type of summer squash.  Green or yellow in color, and shaped like a cucumber, this nutritious vegetable provides vitamin A, folate, potassium and manganese, plus antioxidants such as lutein and zeaxanthin. Like all vegetables, they have plenty of fiber.

Choose smooth, firm zucchini, and if you’re growing them yourself, don’t let them grow too large, as they become fibrous.  You can store them in the refrigerator for several days, but use them before they start to soften and the skins become pitted.

Most famous, perhaps, in the classic French recipe, Ratatouille, zucchini are extremely versatile. They can be consumed raw, as sticks for dipping in hummus or salsa for example, or they can be sliced thickly for veggie kebabs or stews, sliced thinly and lightly fried with herbs, cubed and included in a stir-fry or even split in half, stuffed and baked in the oven. Adding them to muffins or baking zucchini bread is a great way to get young children to eat some vegetables unknowingly!

The following two recipes are reprinted from www.nutritionmd.org with permission

Zucchini Corn Fritters

Makes 16 fritters

Serve these golden fritters with Chili Beans or with Ratatouille.

1 1/3 cups fortified soy- or rice milk
1 tablespoon cider vinegar
1 cup cornmeal
1/4 cup unbleached flour
1/2 teaspoon baking powder
1/2 teaspoon baking soda
1/2 teaspoon salt
1 medium zucchini
1 cup fresh, frozen, or canned corn
1 vegetable oil spray
Combine non-dairy milk and vinegar. Set aside. In a mixing bowl, combine cornmeal, flour, baking powder, baking soda, and salt.

Chop or grate zucchini (you should have about 1 cup), then add to cornmeal mixture. Add non-dairy milk mixture and corn. Stir to mix.

Lightly spray a non-stick griddle or skillet with vegetable oil and heat until a drop of water dances on the surface. Pour on small amounts of batter and cook until edges are dry, about 2 minutes. Carefully turn with a spatula and cook second side until golden brown, about 1 minute. Serve immediately.

Ratatouille 2Ratatouille

Makes 10 1-cup servings

Ratatouille is a perfect dish for late summer and early autumn when tomatoes, peppers, and eggplants are at their peak. Serve with bread or pasta and a crisp green salad.

1/2 cup water
2 onions, chopped
3 garlic cloves, minced
1 large eggplant, diced
1 – 2 pound tomatoes, peeled, seeded, and chopped, or 1 15-ounce can crushed tomatoes
1/2 teaspoon dried basil
1/2 teaspoon dried oregano
1/2 teaspoon dried thyme
1/2 teaspoon salt
1/4 teaspoon black pepper
1 bell pepper, seeded and diced
2 medium zucchini, sliced

Heat the water in a large pot and add onions and garlic. Cook over medium heat, stirring often, until onions are soft, about 5 minutes.

Stir in eggplant, tomatoes, basil, oregano, thyme, salt, and black pepper. Cover and simmer, stirring frequently, until eggplant is just tender when pierced with a fork, about 15 minutes.

Stir in bell pepper and zucchini. Cover and cook until tender, about 5 minutes.

 

The following recipe is from The Veg-Feasting Cookbook, by Vegetarians of Washington.

Untitled-1Tacos de Chayote

Epazote is a pungent herb, available dried in Latin markets. It’s often added to bean dishes as much for its carminative (gas-reducing) properties as for its unique flavor. Chayote (pronounced chi-OH-tay) is a mild, pale green squash about the size of a pear.

Serves 4

12 small corn tortillas

1 medium onion, diced

3 cloves garlic, minced

1 tablespoon dried epazote

3 tablespoons olive oil

1 (28-ounce) can whole tomatoes, drained and chopped

3 medium zucchini, cubed

3 chayotes, seeded and cubed

½ cup raisins

Minced fresh cilantro

Heat the tortillas on a hot griddle to soften them, then wrap them in foil to keep warm and set them aside. In a medium bowl, combine the onion, garlic, epazote, 2 tablespoons of the olive oil, and the tomatoes, and set aside. Heat the remaining tablespoon of oil in a large skillet over medium heat and add the zucchini, chayotes and raisins. Sauté until the squash is just crisp-tender. Add the tomato mixture and sauté until heated through, being careful not to overcook the squash. It should have a slight crunch. Spoon the filling onto the warmed tortillas and sprinkle with the cilantro.

 

 

 

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