Category Archives: Food Products & Recipes

Zippy Zucchini Recipes

Zucchini - white backgroundZucchini, also known as a courgette, is a type of summer squash.  Green or yellow in color, and shaped like a cucumber, this nutritious vegetable provides vitamin A, folate, potassium and manganese, plus antioxidants such as lutein and zeaxanthin. Like all vegetables, they have plenty of fiber.

Choose smooth, firm zucchini, and if you’re growing them yourself, don’t let them grow too large, as they become fibrous.  You can store them in the refrigerator for several days, but use them before they start to soften and the skins become pitted.

Most famous, perhaps, in the classic French recipe, Ratatouille, zucchini are extremely versatile. They can be consumed raw, as sticks for dipping in hummus or salsa for example, or they can be sliced thickly for veggie kebabs or stews, sliced thinly and lightly fried with herbs, cubed and included in a stir-fry or even split in half, stuffed and baked in the oven. Adding them to muffins or baking zucchini bread is a great way to get young children to eat some vegetables unknowingly!

The following two recipes are reprinted from www.nutritionmd.org with permission

Zucchini Corn Fritters

Makes 16 fritters

Serve these golden fritters with Chili Beans or with Ratatouille.

1 1/3 cups fortified soy- or rice milk
1 tablespoon cider vinegar
1 cup cornmeal
1/4 cup unbleached flour
1/2 teaspoon baking powder
1/2 teaspoon baking soda
1/2 teaspoon salt
1 medium zucchini
1 cup fresh, frozen, or canned corn
1 vegetable oil spray
Combine non-dairy milk and vinegar. Set aside. In a mixing bowl, combine cornmeal, flour, baking powder, baking soda, and salt.

Chop or grate zucchini (you should have about 1 cup), then add to cornmeal mixture. Add non-dairy milk mixture and corn. Stir to mix.

Lightly spray a non-stick griddle or skillet with vegetable oil and heat until a drop of water dances on the surface. Pour on small amounts of batter and cook until edges are dry, about 2 minutes. Carefully turn with a spatula and cook second side until golden brown, about 1 minute. Serve immediately.

Ratatouille 2Ratatouille

Makes 10 1-cup servings

Ratatouille is a perfect dish for late summer and early autumn when tomatoes, peppers, and eggplants are at their peak. Serve with bread or pasta and a crisp green salad.

1/2 cup water
2 onions, chopped
3 garlic cloves, minced
1 large eggplant, diced
1 – 2 pound tomatoes, peeled, seeded, and chopped, or 1 15-ounce can crushed tomatoes
1/2 teaspoon dried basil
1/2 teaspoon dried oregano
1/2 teaspoon dried thyme
1/2 teaspoon salt
1/4 teaspoon black pepper
1 bell pepper, seeded and diced
2 medium zucchini, sliced

Heat the water in a large pot and add onions and garlic. Cook over medium heat, stirring often, until onions are soft, about 5 minutes.

Stir in eggplant, tomatoes, basil, oregano, thyme, salt, and black pepper. Cover and simmer, stirring frequently, until eggplant is just tender when pierced with a fork, about 15 minutes.

Stir in bell pepper and zucchini. Cover and cook until tender, about 5 minutes.

 

The following recipe is from The Veg-Feasting Cookbook, by Vegetarians of Washington.

Untitled-1Tacos de Chayote

Epazote is a pungent herb, available dried in Latin markets. It’s often added to bean dishes as much for its carminative (gas-reducing) properties as for its unique flavor. Chayote (pronounced chi-OH-tay) is a mild, pale green squash about the size of a pear.

Serves 4

12 small corn tortillas

1 medium onion, diced

3 cloves garlic, minced

1 tablespoon dried epazote

3 tablespoons olive oil

1 (28-ounce) can whole tomatoes, drained and chopped

3 medium zucchini, cubed

3 chayotes, seeded and cubed

½ cup raisins

Minced fresh cilantro

Heat the tortillas on a hot griddle to soften them, then wrap them in foil to keep warm and set them aside. In a medium bowl, combine the onion, garlic, epazote, 2 tablespoons of the olive oil, and the tomatoes, and set aside. Heat the remaining tablespoon of oil in a large skillet over medium heat and add the zucchini, chayotes and raisins. Sauté until the squash is just crisp-tender. Add the tomato mixture and sauté until heated through, being careful not to overcook the squash. It should have a slight crunch. Spoon the filling onto the warmed tortillas and sprinkle with the cilantro.

 

 

 

Four pieces of good news for vegetarians

We’re happy to see the growth of food made with plant-based ingredients. It’s never been easier to be a vegetarian. Our choices and access to plant-based foods continues to grow and grow. Here are the latest four pieces of news:

Plant-based food – the leading trend

Plant Based foodsAt a recent Natural Products Expo, plant-based foods was the leading trend in the food industry.  Environmental, health and ethical concerns related to the production and consumption of animal products has moved purposefully plant-based foods, once relegated to the vegan and vegetarian minority, into the mainstream. Innovative new meat and dairy alternatives are improving upon taste and texture all the time, therefore widening the appeal of a plant-based way of eating. Read more

Succulent Strawberry Recipes

strawberriesFresh strawberries are the sweet red fruit of the strawberry plant. They are at their best fresh in the summer months, although imported strawberries can be found year round.  Frozen strawberries are always available and work very well in smoothies or desserts where a fresh texture is not so important.

Strawberries contain natural sugars and some dietary fiber, with plenty of vitamin C. Fresh strawberries are delicious but they don’t keep for long, so be sure to wash and trim them, then eat them as soon as possible.

It’s well worth the investment in organic strawberries.  Non-organic strawberries are grown with a large selection of pesticides, making them some of the most toxin-laden produce available.  Organic strawberries on the other hand, are allowed to ripen slowly in the sun, absorbing the nutrients of the soil.  The result is a firmer fruit, with less water content and much more flavor.

The following recipes are from www.nutritionmd.org, reprinted with permission

Strawberry Shortcake

Makes 4 servings
Fresh strawberries are a sign of summer. For fun, cut the shortcakes into different shapes using cookie cutters.
2 1/2 cups sliced fresh strawberries
4 teaspoons sugar
1 cup whole-wheat flour
1 1/2 teaspoons baking powder
1/4 teaspoon baking soda
1/4 teaspoon salt
1 1/2 tablespoons organic canola or safflower oil
1 tablespoon frozen apple juice concentrate, thawed (undiluted)
1/3 cup fortified plain or vanilla soy- or rice milk, as needed

1/2 cup Tofu Whipped Topping or other non-dairy whipped topping

Combine strawberries and sugar and toss gently. Let stand 30 minutes. Preheat oven to 450°F. To make the shortcakes, combine flour, baking powder, baking soda, and salt in a large bowl and stir with a dry wire whisk. Combine oil and juice concentrate in a small measuring cup and beat with a fork until well blended. Pour into flour mixture, and cut in with a pastry blender or fork until the mixture resembles fine crumbs.

Using a fork, stir in just enough non-dairy milk so dough leaves the sides of the bowl and rounds up into a ball. (Too much non-dairy milk will make the dough sticky; not enough milk will make the shortcakes dry.) Turn dough out onto a lightly floured surface and knead lightly 20 to 25 times, about 30 seconds, then gently smooth into a ball. Roll or pat dough into a 1/2-inch-thick circle and cut with a floured 3-inch biscuit cutter into 4 rounds. Place shortcakes on a dry baking sheet as soon as they are cut, spacing them about 1-inch apart. Bake on center rack of oven until golden brown, about 10 to 12 minutes. Immediately transfer to a cooling rack.

Carefully split shortcakes crosswise while they are warm, and spread with a small amount of the whipped topping. Place bottom halves of shortcakes on four dessert plates, and spoon half of the strawberries over them. Cover with the top halves of the shortcakes. Spoon on remaining strawberries, and top with the remaining whipped topping.

Tip:
If desired, any other fresh, seasonal berries of your choice may be substituted for the strawberries.

Kiwi Strawberry Salad

Makes 2 servings

1 pint large organic strawberries
4 kiwis
1 tablespoon lime juice
2 tablespoons agave nectar or honey
2 tablespoons orange juice
lime zest, for garnish

Rinse strawberries and pat dry with paper towel. Cut or pull out the leaves as well as the hull of the strawberries with a paring knife. Peel kiwis with the knife. Cut strawberries and kiwis into thick slices. Arrange the fruit in overlapping layers on a serving dish. In a small bowl, mix lime juice, agave nectar or honey, and orange juice until blended to make the dressing. Drizzle the fruit with the dressing. Garnish with lime zest.

 

The following recipe is from The Veg-Feasting Cookbook, by Vegetarians of Washington

Fruit Smoothie

If you prefer a more liquid consistency, replace some of the tofu with more soymilk. For a more solid dessert, use more tofu and less soymilk. You can use other fresh fruits in season, such as peaches, pineapple, nectarines, mango, papaya, kiwi, pears, cantaloupe, etc. Be adventurous!

Serves 1

4 ounces (1/2 cup) silken tofu

1/2 cup vanilla soymilk

1/2 cup frozen strawberries

1 large banana

Place all the ingredients in a blender and puree until smooth and creamy.  Serve.

Celebrate launch of California Pizza Kitchen’s vegan pizza!

Come celebrate the breakthrough! Daiya nondairy “cheese” will be served for the first time ever at a California Pizza Kitchen. The kickoff is this Wednesday (Aug 9) 5pm – 8pm at the California Pizza Kitchen, Park West Plaza in Tukwila.

To celebrate this historic moment, the location is throwing a HUGE launch party for attendees to enjoy pizza, drinks, and tons of free Daiya giveaways.

We want the dairy-free “cheese” to be offered nationally, so make sure to invite all of your friends so we can show California Pizza Kitchen just how big the demand for vegan options really is!

We thank our friends at Daiya and Vegan Outreach for putting together this historic event.

Daiya CPK poster

 

Tempting Barbecue Recipes

Grills Gone Vegan_low resIt’s summertime.  Time to light up the grill.  Yes, there are endless possibilities for grilling without using meat or fish. One option is to check out this wonderful cookbook from the Book Publishing Company, which captures a wide variety of possibilities in one easy-to-use book.

Grills Gone Vegan is the latest cookbook from Tamasin Noyes. Tamasin has been vegetarian for over thirty years, and vegan for much of that time. She and her husband, Jim, live in northeastern Ohio with their two cats. Along the way, Tamasin has baked for a vegan café, worked in restaurants, created a nonprofit group that sent handmade cards to children with life-threatening illnesses, and had a vegan soap company for ten years.

Passionate about cooking, Tamasin spent several years as a cookbook tester for some of the leading vegan authors. She is also the author of American Vegan Kitchen and the coauthor of Vegan Sandwiches Save the Day.

Here are a couple of delicious recipes:

Portobello Burgers with Mango Chutney Marinade

Read more

Plant-Based Dairy Alternatives Increase

MilksPlant-powered dairy alternatives have been growing fast worldwide. Sales have more than doubled in the last 8 years and there’s no end in sight. The growing availability and promotion of plant-based options to traditional dairy lines, particularly beverages, has helped boost this market, along with cultured products such as yogurt, frozen desserts and ice cream, creamers, and cheese. Almost all mainstream supermarkets now have some dairy-free alternatives.

A range of increasingly sophisticated flavors and blends of non-dairy milks from different sources are being launched. While soy-based beverage products remain popular, the market has expanded to include an increasing selection of alternative milks, using grains such as rice, quinoa, oats, and barley; and nuts such as almonds, hazelnuts, and macadamias, as well as seed milks such as hemp and flaxseed. In just the past year two new primary ingredients for U.S. plant-based milks, pistachio and pecan, have emerged.

Seeing the success of these products, the dairy industry is getting nervous. In fact, the dairy sector has become so concerned about the success of plant-based milks that it recently prompted 32 Congressmen to write a letter to FDA. The letter, which requests the agency enforce their rule against non-dairy beverages carrying the term “milk,” was meant to prevent the dairy industry from losing further market share to plant-based alternatives. However, they tried this tactic with mayonnaise and it didn’t work then. We don’t think it will work this time either.

Try out some of the many new plant-based milks available in your grocery store. For tips on buying dairy alternatives check out our shopping guide In Pursuit of Great Food.

Mouthwatering Melon Recipes

melonsMelons are large, edible fruits with a thick yellow or green skin, and juicy, fragrant flesh. Since the flesh has such high water content, melons are low in calories even though they are so sweet to taste. They provide potassium, sulphur, Vitamins A and C and Folic Acid.

Watermelon is particularly high in lycopene, an antioxidant, and has iron as well, which makes it the star of the melon family nutritionally speaking.

All melons are particularly delicious in the summer months, at the peak of their ripeness. They can be eaten by the slice, cut into cubes or scooped into balls. They are delicious eaten alone or as part of a fruit or vegetable salad. Pureed melon can be served chilled to make an attractive summer soup.

Recipes:

Read more

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